Wild things

We’ve had a busy time with the wild life lately, what with hedgehogs, red squirrels, a fox and even a bat:  The Old Rectory becoming a makeshift animal hospital for a few nights.

First though, a young fox has been visiting the hedgehog feeding station a couple of weeks now. It could be a cub of the nursing vixen who came through our little wood and ate with the hedgehogs back in May. This young fox was very skittish at first: scared of the red glow that the Trail Cam gives off when it is recording but hunger got the better of it. It tickles me that it paws at the hedgehog food to select the bits that it likes and leaves the rest. I am not sure which are its choice bits.

 


Last week, we saw an injured hedgehog on the Trail cam footage. The following night, we went out around midnight and with luck, the first hog we came across was the injured hedgehog.   We  checked to see if it was a male or female, as we didn’t want to be leaving some nest of hoglets without a mother somewhere. As it turned out, the injured hedgehog was a male and to our surprise, still had the remains of blue nail polish on the tips of a few quills at the very back-end of him. This was the hedgehog that I had marked way back in March! Then, I had named him Stella, thinking it to be female. Stella is now correctly named Stellan. Back in March, Stellan weighed 929g and now he weighs 727g, losing 202g since coming out of hibernation. I’m not an expert when it comes to hedgehogs, (even though at times it feels like I eat, sleep and breathe hedgehogs) so I don’t know if this amount of weight loss is a normal amount or not for this time of year, but 727g is still a good weight and, other than what looks like an injury caused most likely by a garden strimmer, Stellan looked to be healthy.  He had lost half of a toe and the skin from the back of his paw had been stripped off.

IMG_6479

The healing had already started with healthy pink skin covering most of the back of the paw but the injured toe stump was still raw. As it was very late at night (not an easy time to find a vet, especially not for the sake of a hedgehog) I set up the ‘hedgehog hospital’ house, aka a very large rabbit hutch, and gave Stellan some water and minced beef, mealie worms and fresh mango, and settled him down with lots of nice, clean bedding. I would watch the wound for the following day and if it showed signs of infection, or if he looked under the weather, then I would take him to the vet. Twenty four hours later, the back of his foot was much better and the toe stump had begun to heal cleanly. Stellan had a hearty appetite and seemed very content. We kept him for three days in all and on the third night his stump had new skin covering it completely, he was no longer limping and neither wound was infected, so Stellan was a very lucky hedgehog.


On to our red squirrels…

It all started with one red squirrel back in October 2015 and his name was Nibbles…

Nibbles gorgeous photo 5.4.2017

Nibbles

Then Delilah showed up…

Pretty Delilah Beech feeder 4.7.2017 8.02am

Delilah

Then Delilah had three kittens, all boys…

 

Now, we have another mature female (I’ve called her Madame X for the time being) on the feeders.

..and a new kitten has turned up…

… who may or may not belong to Madame X.  Then just the other day, my friend and I realised that we most likely have another mature male around! Keeping track of Delilah, Nibbles and their three kittens was time-consuming and mind-boggling enough but with another three squirrels on the scene, our heads are spinning! 😀 Still, it leaves no time to get bored.  So when I found a bat on the back doorstep the other night, it came as a relief that it was a creature that wasn’t covered in quills or russet-coloured fur!


Meet Dracula…

Dracula

Brandt’s or Whiskered bat

As Dracula was right in the middle of the doorstep, he was in danger of being squashed by our loveable but very heavy 39kg German Shepherd, called Ava, so Dracula was put in a shoe box and the next day we called the local bat people who came around and identified Dracula as either a Brandt’s or a Whiskered bat, before taking him away to give him food and proper care.  We tried to find where Dracula had come from, as he appeared to be a young bat and ideally it would have been best to put him back in his nest. The bat people asked if Izzy and I would sit on bat watch that night.  We sat from about an hour before dark until just after dark, watching the house roof above the spot where Dracula had been found, to see if any other bats flew out which would indicate that there was a nest there.  Not a single bat flew out of the roof that night and in the morning, when I rang the bat people, they gave me the sad news that Dracula had died in the night. 😦


 

2 thoughts on “Wild things

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s